Dry Mouth

Online Dental Education Library

Our team of dental specialists and staff strive to improve the overall health of our patients by focusing on preventing, diagnosing and treating conditions associated with your teeth and gums. Please use our dental library to learn more about dental problems and treatments available. If you have questions or need to schedule an appointment, contact us.


Whitening with Bleaching Trays


Why Do Teeth Crack


Recurrent Decay Around Restoration

 


Progression of Decay


Composite Versus Amalgam Fillings


Composite Filling Anterior

 


Filling Versus Crown


Inlay Impression


Onlay Impression

 


Gingivitis


Periodontitis


Scaling Root Planing

 


Single Tooth Loss


Bridge Versus an Implant


Three Unit Bridge Impression

 


Implant Supported Bridge Anterior - Impression


Single Implant Anterior


Single Implant Posterior

 


Removeable Complete Dentures


Removeable Partial Dentures


Screw-Retained Dentures

 


What is Tooth Wear


Occlusal Appliance For ToothWear


Veneers Impression

 

Saliva is one of your body's natural defenses against plaque because it acts to rinse your mouth of cavity-causing bacteria and other harmful materials. Dry mouth (also called Xerostomia) is a fairly common condition that is caused by diminished saliva production. People with medical conditions, such as an eating disorder or diabetes, are often plagued by dry mouth. Eating foods such as garlic, tobacco use, and some kinds of medications, including treatments such as cancer therapy can diminish the body's production of saliva, leading to dry mouth. Other causes are related to aging (including rheumatoid arthritis), and compromised immune systems.

Some of the less alarming results of dry mouth include bad breath. But dry mouth can lead to more serious problems, including burning tongue syndrome, a painful condition caused by lack of moisture on the tongue.

If dry mouth isn't readily apparent, you may experience other conditions that dry mouth can cause, including an overly-sensitive tongue, chronic thirst or even difficulty in speaking.

If you don't have a medical condition that causes it, dry mouth can be minimized by sipping water regularly, chewing sugarless gum and avoiding smoking. Of course, there is no substitute for regular checkups and good oral hygiene.